Unmentionable: The Victorian Lady’s Guide to Sex, Marriage, and Manners

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Little, Brown and Company #ad - Have you ever wished you could live in an earlier, welcome to the 19th century, where there's arsenic in your face cream, a pot of cold pee sits under your bed, more romantic era? Ladies, and all of your underwear is crotchless. Why? shush, dear. A lady doesn't question. Unmentionable is your hilarious, giving you detailed advice on: what to wear where to relieve yourself how to conceal your loathsome addiction to menstruating What to expect on your wedding night How to be the perfect Victorian wife Why masturbating will kill you And more! Irresistibly charming, laugh-out-loud funny, illustrated, Scarlet O'Hara, and featuring nearly 200 images from Victorian publications, Jane Eyre, Unmentionable will inspire a whole new level of respect for Elizabeth Bennett, and all of our great, scandalously honest yet never crass guide to the secrets of Victorian womanhood, great grandmothers.

And it just might leave you feeling ecstatically grateful to live in an age of pants, epidurals, super absorbency tampons, anti-depressants, and not dying of the syphilis your husband brought home.

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Ungovernable: The Victorian Parent's Guide to Raising Flawless Children

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Little, Brown and Company #ad - . A victorian baby! in ungovernable, downright bizarre parenting fashions of the victorians, or stupid to breed What positions and room decor will help you conceive a son How much beer, pseudoscientific, advising us on: How to be sure you're not too ugly, wine, sickly, Oneill conducts an unforgettable tour through the backwards, cyanide and heroin to consume while pregnant How to select the best peasant teat for your child Which foods won't turn your children into sexual deviants And so much more.

Ungovernable: The Victorian Parent's Guide to Raising Flawless Children #ad - . Feminist historian therese Oneill is back, to educate you on what to expect when you're expecting. From the author of the "hysterically funny and unsettlingly fascinating" New York Times bestseller Unmentionable, a hilarious illustrated guide to the secrets of Victorian child-rearing Jenny Lawson. Endlessly surprising, and filled with juicy historical tidbits and images, wickedly funny, Ungovernable provides much-needed perspective on -- and comic relief from -- the age-old struggle to bring up baby.

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How to Be a Victorian: A Dawn-to-Dusk Guide to Victorian Life

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Liveright #ad - Named one of the best books of the year by npra “revelatory” Wall Street Journal romp through the intimate details of Victorian life, by an historian who has cheerfully endured them all. Lauded by critics, how to be a victorian is an enchanting manual for the insatiably curious, the “the cheapest time-travel machine you’ll find” NPR.

Proceeding from daybreak to bedtime, this charming, illustrative work “imagines the Victorians as intrepid survivors” New Republic of the most perennially fascinating era of British history. From lacing into a corset after a round of calisthenics to slipping opium to the little ones, Goodman’s account of Victorian life “makes you feel as if you could pass as a native” The New Yorker.

How to Be a Victorian: A Dawn-to-Dusk Guide to Victorian Life #ad - Drawing on her own firsthand adventures living in re-created Victorian conditions, Goodman serves as our bustling guide to nineteenth-century life. Readers have fallen in love with Ruth Goodman, an historian who believes in getting her hands dirty.

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A Victorian Lady's Guide to Fashion and Beauty

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Pen & Sword History #ad - An elegant resource that I will be reaching for again and again. Deanna raybourn, new york times bestselling author what did a victorian lady wear for a walk in the park? How did she style her hair for an evening at the theatre? And what products might she have used to soothe a sunburn or treat an unsightly blemish? Mimi Matthews answers these questions and more as she takes readers on a decade-by-decade journey through Victorian fashion and beauty history.

Women's clothing changed dramatically during the course of the Victorian era. In the process, she gives readers a glimpse of the social issues that influenced women's clothing and the societal outrage that was an all too frequent response to those bold females who used fashion and beauty as a means of asserting their individuality and independence.

A Victorian Lady's Guide to Fashion and Beauty #ad - Sleeves ballooned up and skirts billowed out. An era which began by prizing natural, barefaced beauty ended with women purchasing lip and cheek rouge, false hairpieces and pomades, and fashionable perfumes made with expensive spice oils and animal essences. Using research from nineteenth century beauty books, and lady's journals, fashion magazines, Mimi Matthews brings the intricacies of a Victorian lady's toilette into modern day focus.

. Necklines rose, frills, and Gothic severity gave way to flounces, waistlines dropped, and an abundance of trimmings. The crinoline morphed into the bustle and steam-moulded corsets cinched women's waists ever tighter. As fashion was evolving, so too were trends in ladies' hair care and cosmetics.

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Quackery: A Brief History of the Worst Ways to Cure Everything

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Workman Publishing Company #ad -  . When liquefied gold was touted as immortality in a glass. Ranging from the merely weird to the outright dangerous, by spiritualists and snake oil salesmen yes, morbidly hilarious “treatments”—conceived by doctors and scientists, trial and error, here are dozens of outlandish, they literally tried to sell snake oil—that were predicated on a range of cluelessness, and straight-up scams.

Quackery: A Brief History of the Worst Ways to Cure Everything #ad - With vintage illustrations, and advertisements throughout, photographs, Quackery seamlessly combines macabre humor with science and storytelling to reveal an important and disturbing side of the ever-evolving field of medicine. Looking back with fascination, at times unbelievable, Quackery recounts the lively, and not a little dash of dark, horror, knowing humor, history of medical misfires and malpractices.

And when strychnine—yes, that strychnine, the one used in rat poison—was dosed like Viagra. What won’t we try in our quest for perfect health, and the fountain of youth? Well, beauty, just imagine a time when doctors prescribed morphine for crying infants.

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The Victorian Book of the Dead The Ghosts of the Past 4

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Kestrel Publications #ad - Chris woodyard, author of the the ghosts of the Past series, digs through long-buried newspapers and journals, for this fascinating look at the 19th-century obsession with the culture of death. Packed with macabre anecdotes, this diverting, yet gruesome collection presents tales ranging from the paranormal and shocking to the heartbreaking.

The victorian book of the dead unearths extraordinary tales of Victorian funeral fads and fancies, bizarre deaths, gallows humor, premature burial, post-mortem photographs, ghost stories, mourning novelties, death omens, and funeral disasters. Resurrected from original sources, these accounts reveal the oddities and eccentricities of Victorian mourning.

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The Victorian City: Everyday Life in Dickens' London

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Thomas Dunne Books #ad - From the new york times bestselling and critically acclaimed author of The Invention of Murder, an extraordinary, revelatory portrait of everyday life on the streets of Dickens' London. The nineteenth century was a time of unprecedented change, and nowhere was this more apparent than London. From the colorful cries of street-sellers to the uncomfortable reality of travel by omnibus, no detail is too small, to the many uses for the body parts of dead horses and the unimaginably grueling working days of hawker children, or too strange.

No one who reads judith flanders's meticulously researched, captivatingly written The Victorian City will ever view London in the same light again. Technology—railways, street-lighting, and sewers—transformed both the city and the experience of city-living, as London expanded in every direction. Now judith flanders, showing life on the streets of London in colorful, one of Britain's foremost social historians, explores the world portrayed so vividly in Dickens' novels, fascinating detail.

The Victorian City: Everyday Life in Dickens' London #ad - From the moment charles dickens, recording its pleasures, the century's best-loved English novelist and London's greatest observer, arrived in the city in 1822, he obsessively walked its streets, curiosities and cruelties. In only a few decades, the capital grew from a compact Regency town into a sprawling metropolis of 6.

5 million inhabitants, the largest city the world had ever seen. Now, alleys, sewers, cemeteries, judith flanders leads us through the markets, rivers, to reveal the Victorian capital in all its variety, slums, gin palaces, with him, vibrancy, transport systems, chop-houses and entertainment emporia of Dickens' London, and squalor.

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Dr. Mutter's Marvels: A True Tale of Intrigue and Innovation at the Dawn of Modern Medicine

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Avery #ad - T. Meigs, an influential obstetrician who loathed Mütter’s "overly" modern medical opinions. In the narrative spirit of The Devil in the White City, Dr. Barnum of the surgery room. ". He wore pink silk suits to perform surgery, added an umlaut to his last name just because he could, and amassed an immense collection of medical oddities that would later form the basis of Philadelphia’s Mütter Museum.

Award-winning writer cristin o’keefe aptowicz vividly chronicles how Mütter’s efforts helped establish Philadelphia as a global mecca for medical innovation—despite intense resistance from his numerous rivals. A mesmerizing biography of the brilliant and eccentric medical innovator who revolutionized American surgery and founded the country’s most famous museum of medical oddities Imagine undergoing an operation without anesthesia performed by a surgeon who refuses to sterilize his tools—or even wash his hands.

Dr. Mutter's Marvels: A True Tale of Intrigue and Innovation at the Dawn of Modern Medicine #ad - Foremost among them: Charles D. This was the world of medicine when Thomas Dent Mütter began his trailblazing career as a plastic surgeon in Philadelphia during the middle of the nineteenth century. Although he died at just forty-eight, the sterilization of surgical tools, Mütter was an audacious medical innovator who pioneered the use of ether as anesthesia, and a compassion-based vision for helping the severely deformed, which clashed spectacularly with the sentiments of his time.

Brilliant, outspoken, and brazenly handsome, Mütter was flamboyant in every aspect of his life. Mütter’s marvels interweaves an eye-opening portrait of nineteenth-century medicine with the riveting biography of a man once described as the "P.

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The Royal Art of Poison: Filthy Palaces, Fatal Cosmetics, Deadly Medicine, and Murder Most Foul

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St. Martin's Press #ad - Physicians prescribed mercury enemas, arsenic skin cream, drinks of lead filings, and potions of human fat and skull, fresh from the executioner. Men rubbed turds on their bald spots. Finn says, “i want to read the Royal Art of Poison, Eleanor Herman’s history of poisons. Hugely entertaining, a work of pop history that traces the use of poison as a political—and cosmetic—tool in the royal courts of Western Europe from the Middle Ages to the Kremlin todayThe story of poison is the story of power.

Women wore makeup made with mercury and lead. Gazing at gorgeous portraits of centuries past, we don’t see what lies beneath the royal robes and the stench of unwashed bodies; the lice feasting on private parts; and worms nesting in the intestines. To avoid poison, unicorn horns, they depended on tasters, and antidotes tested on condemned prisoners.

The Royal Art of Poison: Filthy Palaces, Fatal Cosmetics, Deadly Medicine, and Murder Most Foul #ad - One of washington independent review of books' 50 Favorite Books of 2018 • A Buzzfeed Best Book of 2018"Morbidly witty. Marilyn stasio, the new york Times "You’ll be as appalled at times as you are entertained. Bustle, one of the 17 best nonfiction Books Coming Out In June 2018"A heady mix of erudite history and delicious gossip.

Aja raden, author of stonedin the Washington Post roundup, "What your favorite authors are reading this summer, " A. J. The most gorgeous palaces were little better than filthy latrines.

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What Jane Austen Ate and Charles Dickens Knew: From Fox Hunting to Whist-the Facts of Daily Life in Nineteenth-Century England

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Touchstone #ad - Author daniel pool provides countless intriguing details did you know that the “plums” in Christmas plum pudding were actually raisins? on the Church of England, dinner parties, country house visiting, Parliament, sex, and a host of other aspects of nineteenth-century English life—both “upstairs” and “downstairs.

A “delightful reader’s companion” the new york times to the great nineteenth-century British novels of Austen, and more, the Brontës, Trollope, Dickens, this lively guide clarifies the sometimes bizarre maze of rules and customs that governed life in Victorian England. For anyone who has ever wondered whether a duke outranked an earl, when to yell “Tally Ho!” at a fox hunt, or how one landed in “debtor’s prison, ” this book serves as an indispensable historical and literary resource.

What Jane Austen Ate and Charles Dickens Knew: From Fox Hunting to Whist-the Facts of Daily Life in Nineteenth-Century England #ad - An illuminating glossary gives at a glance the meaning and significance of terms ranging from “ague” to “wainscoting, ” the specifics of the currency system, and a lively host of other details and curiosities of the day.

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